SPDRS&P 500ETF (SPY)

SPY (NAL:Financial Services) ETF
$186.63
pos +0.00
+0.00%
Today's Range: 183.96 - 186.65 | SPY Avg Daily Volume: 149,492,600
Last Update: 02/12/16 - 4:00 PM EST
Volume: 0
YTD Performance: -8.46%
Open: $0.00
Previous Close: $182.86
52 Week Range: $181.02 - $213.78
Oustanding Shares: 901,382,115
Market Cap: 164,826,733,549
6-Month Chart
TheStreet Ratings Grade for SPY
Buy Hold Sell
A+ A A- B+ B B- C+ C C- D+ D D- E+ E E- F
TheStreet Ratings is the source for accurate ratings that you can rely upon to make sound, informed financial decisions. Click here to find out about our methodology.
Analysts Ratings
Historical Rec Current 1 Mo. Ago 2 Mo. Ago 3 Mo. Ago
Strong Buy
Moderate Buy
Hold
Moderate Sell
Strong Sell
Mean Rec. 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Latest Dividend: 0.00
Latest Dividend Yield: 0.00%
Dividend Ex-Date: 12/31/69
Price Earnings Ratio: 0.00
Price Earnings Comparisons:
SPY Sector Avg. S&P 500
0.00 0.00 26.86
Price Performance History (%Change):
3 Mo 1 Yr 3 Y
-8.89% -10.67% 22.77%
GROWTH 12 Mo 3 Yr CAGR
Revenue 0.00 0.00 0.00
Net Income 0.00 0.00 0.00
EPS 0.00 0.00 0.00
Earnings for SPY:
EBITDA 0.00B
Revenue 0.00B
Average Earnings Estimates

Earnings Estimates data is not available for SPY.

Chart Benchmark Timeframe
Average Frequency Indicator Chart
Scale Symbol Comparison Bollinger Bands
As I wrote in my opener, "At a Good Turn, You Will Not Want to Buy," I chronicled gems from legendary technical analyst Wally Deemer and expressed the view that bottoms are rarely accompanied by optimism and buying -- though I am sure the storytellers in the business media likely already will have forgotten their Cassandra-like warnings of yesterday. We closed right on my Fair Market Value calculation of 1864! We closed nearly 60 handles from yesterday's lows/test. I consider today a successful test of the 1812 capitulation low of yesterday and 3 ½ weeks ago. Today's bounce showed how many were offsides and essentially immobilized by the recent declines. Many were clearly short equities and/or crude, and today's up move demonstrated how conservatively positioned the longs are. The contrary worked this week. Does that mean we go straight up?  Obviously not. As I posted, I thought it prudent to scale back my large long exposure to between small and medium in size in front of the weekend. Frankly, I want to enjoy myself and not worry about large positions. My long "Trade of the Week," Citigroup (C), at $37.70 provided no profits but it could have been worse; it closed the week down 15 cents after some drama!  My short "Trade of the Week," iShares 20+ Year Treasury Bond ETF (TLT), was a big win of $4 in about 24 hours. I closed it and my long ProShares UltraShort 20+ Year Treasury (TBT) out.  The U.S. dollar strengthened. Crude was the standout asset class, up by $2.94 to $29.15. Gold gave back $8.60 Agricultural commodities flatlined, with wheat, corn, sugar, soybeans and oats unchanged. Lumber was up $2.10. Treasuries were nine to 10 basis points higher at the longer end  and the yield curve began to steepen from its flatness. Municipals got hit and so did closedend municipal bond funds. High yield was quite strong, maybe the largest gains in weeks. iShares iBoxx $ High Yield Corporate Bond ETF (HYG) was up $1.17 and SPDR Barclays High Yield Bond ETF (JNK) was up 47 cents. Blackstone/GSO Strategic Credit Fund (BGB) disappointed and was flat; I added to an already large holding. Jamie Dimon set the positive tone for banks this morning and so did the Deutsche Bank (DB) bond tender as well as the improvement in crude oil, and boy did the sector respond, with gains of 6% to 8%, albeit from depressed levels. Citigroup rose $2.50, JPMorgan Chase (JPM) was up $4.40 for its best day in five years, and Wells Fargo (WFC) and Comerica (CMA) also rose. I purchased depressed and controversial DB to add to my long list of bank longs. Brokerages shined, with 3% to 5% gains; see Dan Loeb on Morgan Stanley (MS) below. Life insurance stocks reversed yesterday's losses. I covered long-time life insurance shorts and purchased calls after 40% gains in only a few months. Lincoln National (LNC) and MetLife (MET) remain on my Best Ideas List because I plan to short strength. They're oversold for now, as was the market. I added to Hartford Financial Services Group (HIG) and Allstate (ALL) longs.  Retail was stronger despite some downgrades for Best Buy (BBY) and Bed, Bath and Beyond (BBBY). The stocks are dirt cheap. I continue to hold Macy's (M) -- my favorite -- BBY and BBBY. Remodelers Home Depot (HD) and Lowe's (LOW) had dead-cat bounces. Media, though higher, disappointed in its bounce-back. I remain short with small positions in Comcast (CMCSA) and Disney (DIS). Autos were higher. I covered General Motors (GM) today, but it is still on my Best Ideas List as I am a short-seller on 10% strength. Biotech was up 3%, with Valeant Pharmaceuticals (VRX) and Allergan (AGN) performing better.  My 12-stock biotech basket did well. Large caps Celgene (CELG) and Gilead Sciences (GILD) were $2 to $3 higher. Speculative Acadia Pharmaceuticals (ACAD), Portola Pharmaceuticals (PTLA) and Sage Therapeutics (SAGE) -- now up 10% from yesterday -- were stronger. (T)FANG was conspicuously weak, with negligible gains. Tesla (TSLA) was down on the day. The words in my opener rang true: "The market's former leaders (biotech, Internet, health care and consumer discretionary stocks) all seem to be in an initial leg down, but look like they're oversold and could have a weak bounce, with a test to come later. That could represent an important intermediate-term leadership change." Remember, leadership changes are typically not market-friendly.  Let's watch (T)FANG closely in the days ahead. NOSH members were all higher, but not materially so. CRABBY was happy with C, Radian Group (RDN), ALL and Alleghany (Y) faring well. Dan Loeb's Third Point just filed with 3 million shares of MS. He also increased his position in Dow Chemical (DOW). I sold two-thirds of my SPDR S&P 500 ETF (SPY) long rental and half of my iShares Russell 2000 (IWM) at good prices and for profits. This, coupled with some short covers and additional buys (including ALL, BGB and HIG), moved me from a large to between small and medium in

Novice Trade: S&P 500 ETF Real Money Pro($)

This is a way to play what could be a bounce.

Selling Some SPY and IWM Real Money Pro($)

I'm thinking that the $186 gap in the SPDR S&P 500 ETF might be a formidable hurdle today given that we're heading into a long weekend that's filled with uncertainties.

Selling a Third of My SPY Long Real Money Pro($)

Housekeeping item: I've sold one-third of my long of the SPDR S&P 500 ETF (SPY) at $185.60.
It's hard not to bet on less downside from here.
Deflationary trends in energy products and other commodities have accelerated. Oil closed below $28 a barrel yesterday. The Japanese yen's rise to a 15-month high probably implies that players are unwinding carry trades, plus a number of other leveraged trades as well (given that the euro is charging higher against the U.S. dollar, too). Slowing global economic growth has confused an uncertain central-banking system, and markets have begun questioning their previous confidence in central banks' paths and impact. (I call this the
The U.S. dollar reversed the recent trend and increased in value relative to the euro today. There were three dips today, and all of them held as the market bent a bit but didn't break. However, as of 3:15 p.m. ET, SPDR S&P 500 ETF (SPY) was at the low of the day. The Russell's $95 support held from yesterday. Qs (Nasdaq) over Ss (S&P)and Rs (Russell) today.  Bonds didn't cooperate and moved higher in price and lower in yield. As The Lindsey Group's Peter Boockvar mentioned, the yield curve flattened. The 10- and 30-year yields dropped another two to three basis points. Municipals, however, had a bid to them and the closed-end municipal bond funds continued on their spree. High yield was flat as a pancake and so was Blackstone/GSO Strategic Credit Fund (BGB). iShares iBoxx $ High Yield Corporate Bond ETF (HYG) and SPDR Barclays High Yield Bond ETF (JNK) were marginally higher. Gold was down for the second day in a row, off $6.20). Boca Biff is squawking! Crude oil dropped by 30 cents, closing at $27.64, and natural gas was down a nickel. In the agricultural commodities, wheat was three pennies higher, corn and soybeans are flat. Lumber was down by $3.30. Bank stocks couldn't hold the early gains and are flat on the day as the flattening yield curve weighs on the sector. Brokerages were slight up on the day; Goldman Sachs (GS) was up $1.60). Private equity did well after a Carlyle repurchase announcement. Blackstone Group (BX) was up 2%. Alternative asset manager Oaktree Capital Group (OAK) was up by nearly $2. Energy stocks showed small losses. Retail was fractionally better after a few days of schmeissing. Old tech was mixed -- IBM (IBM) was down $3 and was a low light. Media was weighed down again by Disney (DIS) -- here is my write-up on the company -- and some old-media stocks. Twenty-First Century Fox (FOX) and CBS (CBS) shares prospered. Biotech was strong -- up 2.5%. Allergan (AGN) was the standout, up $7). My spec, Intrexon (XON), faltered after a "yuge" run.  (T)FANG was higher, led by Netflix (NFLX), but Tesla (TSLA) continues its death spiral. I remain short both. NOSH was tasty, with broad gains in Nike (NKE), O'Reilly Automotive (ORLY), Starbucks (SBUX) and Home Depot (HD). CRABBY was stronger. I bought SPY and iShares Russell 2000 (IWM) on the dips today. My "Trade of the Week" is Citigroup (C), but we need some help on the interest rate front for this to work over the near term. Stil

Today's Trades Real Money Pro($)

Among individual stocks, I added to my longs of Bank of America (BAC), BB&T Corp. (BBT), the Blackstone/GSO Strategic Credit closed-end fund (BGB), Citigroup (C), Oaktree Capital (OAK), Regions Financial (RF) and Wells Fargo (WFC). Among ETFs, I used the morning's dip to
Bold calls are in fact sales calls. 
What is the range of likely future outcomes? Which outcome do I think will occur? What's the probability I'm right? What does the consensus think? How does my expectation differ from the consensus? How does the current price for the asset comport with the consensus view of the future and with mine? Is the consensus psychology that's incorporated in the price too bullish or bearish? What will happen to the asset's price if the consensus turns out to be right, and what if I'm right? -- Howard Marks, It's Not Easy (Sept, 9, 2015) If you're looking for someone who's reactive, solely influenced by the current price trend and ignores the emerging and changing risk-vs.-reward ratio, stop reading this missive. But if you're looking for someone who's anticipatory and fully influenced by the difference between current share prices and an analytical assessment of intrinsic value (i.e., risk vs. reward), then read on. I'm playing the contrary in the belief that the Jan. 20 "noon swoon" and the possibility it was a "capitulation low" (given the extreme negative-sentiment readings that we saw) added up to an important oversold condition. That came close to being tested over the last few days, so I think a tradeable bounce similar to one that occurred shortly after Jan. 20 could happen again. As such, I moved to a net-long position yesterday by re-establishing a long of the SPDR S&P 500 ETF (SPY) and taking a long in the iShares Russell 2000 ETF (IWM). But unlike many, I'm not certain of view (as reflected in my small- to medium-sized net-long exposure). If I were, my positions over the last few months would have been larger. I recognize that we're in a market that's without memory from day to day, as well as one that might not provide positive returns for the year. In fact, I continue to expect the S&P 500 to ring up a low-double-digit decline for 2016 as a whole. This puts a premium on "gaming" any 5% market moves in order to "make hay when the sun is (briefly) shining." For now, I'd recommend disregarding all of the sentiment surveys. Instead, take note of the apparent self-confidence that exists in a near-universal belief among technicians and fundamentalists that we're in a bear market where investors should underweight stocks or skip them altogether. Heck, even my uber-bullish pal Tony Dwyer threw in the towel on CNBC on

Columnist Conversations

Judge Smails embarrassed me into writing it!
Some pretty obvious selling in the FATMAN names vs the Nasdaq futures post regular session open. FATM...
You can see the time/price support on the daily chart of SPX below. It also shows you the next major decision ...
$185.80 Exhausted and a long weekend. Column up shortly Sold some IWM as well.

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