iShares Russell 2000 ETF (IWM)

IWM (n.a.:Financial Services) ETF
$95.83
pos +0.05
+0.05%
Today's Range: 95.68 - 97.92 | IWM Avg Daily Volume: 40,577,900
Last Update: 02/10/16 - 4:00 PM EST
Volume: 42,636,895
YTD Performance: -14.95%
Open: $96.45
Previous Close: $95.78
52 Week Range: $94.94 - $129.10
Oustanding Shares: 228,850,000
Market Cap: 22,068,005,500
6-Month Chart
TheStreet Ratings Grade for IWM
Buy Hold Sell
A+ A A- B+ B B- C+ C C- D+ D D- E+ E E- F
TheStreet Ratings is the source for accurate ratings that you can rely upon to make sound, informed financial decisions. Click here to find out about our methodology.
Analysts Ratings
Historical Rec Current 1 Mo. Ago 2 Mo. Ago 3 Mo. Ago
Strong Buy
Moderate Buy
Hold
Moderate Sell
Strong Sell
Mean Rec. 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
Latest Dividend: 0.00
Latest Dividend Yield: 0.00%
Dividend Ex-Date: 12/31/69
Price Earnings Ratio: 0.00
Price Earnings Comparisons:
IWM Sector Avg. S&P 500
0.00 0.00 26.96
Price Performance History (%Change):
3 Mo 1 Yr 3 Y
-18.71% -19.42% 5.48%
GROWTH 12 Mo 3 Yr CAGR
Revenue 0.00 0.00 0.00
Net Income 0.00 0.00 0.00
EPS 0.00 0.00 0.00
Earnings for IWM:
EBITDA 0.00B
Revenue 0.00B
Average Earnings Estimates

Earnings Estimates data is not available for IWM.

Chart Benchmark Timeframe
Average Frequency Indicator Chart
Scale Symbol Comparison Bollinger Bands
The U.S. dollar reversed the recent trend and increased in value relative to the euro today. There were three dips today, and all of them held as the market bent a bit but didn't break. However, as of 3:15 p.m. ET, SPDR S&P 500 ETF (SPY) was at the low of the day. The Russell's $95 support held from yesterday. Qs (Nasdaq) over Ss (S&P)and Rs (Russell) today.  Bonds didn't cooperate and moved higher in price and lower in yield. As The Lindsey Group's Peter Boockvar mentioned, the yield curve flattened. The 10- and 30-year yields dropped another two to three basis points. Municipals, however, had a bid to them and the closed-end municipal bond funds continued on their spree. High yield was flat as a pancake and so was Blackstone/GSO Strategic Credit Fund (BGB). iShares iBoxx $ High Yield Corporate Bond ETF (HYG) and SPDR Barclays High Yield Bond ETF (JNK) were marginally higher. Gold was down for the second day in a row, off $6.20). Boca Biff is squawking! Crude oil dropped by 30 cents, closing at $27.64, and natural gas was down a nickel. In the agricultural commodities, wheat was three pennies higher, corn and soybeans are flat. Lumber was down by $3.30. Bank stocks couldn't hold the early gains and are flat on the day as the flattening yield curve weighs on the sector. Brokerages were slight up on the day; Goldman Sachs (GS) was up $1.60). Private equity did well after a Carlyle repurchase announcement. Blackstone Group (BX) was up 2%. Alternative asset manager Oaktree Capital Group (OAK) was up by nearly $2. Energy stocks showed small losses. Retail was fractionally better after a few days of schmeissing. Old tech was mixed -- IBM (IBM) was down $3 and was a low light. Media was weighed down again by Disney (DIS) -- here is my write-up on the company -- and some old-media stocks. Twenty-First Century Fox (FOX) and CBS (CBS) shares prospered. Biotech was strong -- up 2.5%. Allergan (AGN) was the standout, up $7). My spec, Intrexon (XON), faltered after a "yuge" run.  (T)FANG was higher, led by Netflix (NFLX), but Tesla (TSLA) continues its death spiral. I remain short both. NOSH was tasty, with broad gains in Nike (NKE), O'Reilly Automotive (ORLY), Starbucks (SBUX) and Home Depot (HD). CRABBY was stronger. I bought SPY and iShares Russell 2000 (IWM) on the dips today. My "Trade of the Week" is Citigroup (C), but we need some help on the interest rate front for this to work over the near term. Stil

Today's Trades Real Money Pro($)

Among individual stocks, I added to my longs of Bank of America (BAC), BB&T Corp. (BBT), the Blackstone/GSO Strategic Credit closed-end fund (BGB), Citigroup (C), Oaktree Capital (OAK), Regions Financial (RF) and Wells Fargo (WFC). Among ETFs, I used the morning's dip to
What is the range of likely future outcomes? Which outcome do I think will occur? What's the probability I'm right? What does the consensus think? How does my expectation differ from the consensus? How does the current price for the asset comport with the consensus view of the future and with mine? Is the consensus psychology that's incorporated in the price too bullish or bearish? What will happen to the asset's price if the consensus turns out to be right, and what if I'm right? -- Howard Marks, It's Not Easy (Sept, 9, 2015) If you're looking for someone who's reactive, solely influenced by the current price trend and ignores the emerging and changing risk-vs.-reward ratio, stop reading this missive. But if you're looking for someone who's anticipatory and fully influenced by the difference between current share prices and an analytical assessment of intrinsic value (i.e., risk vs. reward), then read on. I'm playing the contrary in the belief that the Jan. 20 "noon swoon" and the possibility it was a "capitulation low" (given the extreme negative-sentiment readings that we saw) added up to an important oversold condition. That came close to being tested over the last few days, so I think a tradeable bounce similar to one that occurred shortly after Jan. 20 could happen again. As such, I moved to a net-long position yesterday by re-establishing a long of the SPDR S&P 500 ETF (SPY) and taking a long in the iShares Russell 2000 ETF (IWM). But unlike many, I'm not certain of view (as reflected in my small- to medium-sized net-long exposure). If I were, my positions over the last few months would have been larger. I recognize that we're in a market that's without memory from day to day, as well as one that might not provide positive returns for the year. In fact, I continue to expect the S&P 500 to ring up a low-double-digit decline for 2016 as a whole. This puts a premium on "gaming" any 5% market moves in order to "make hay when the sun is (briefly) shining." For now, I'd recommend disregarding all of the sentiment surveys. Instead, take note of the apparent self-confidence that exists in a near-universal belief among technicians and fundamentalists that we're in a bear market where investors should underweight stocks or skip them altogether. Heck, even my uber-bullish pal Tony Dwyer threw in the towel on CNBC on
As days go these days, stocks were on the quiet side. Up down up down up, thus far. The U.S. dollar's weakness has accelerated. Oil vey, more crude weakness -- dropping by $1.46 to $28.23. Gold fell $3.70 for a change, but the strong uptrend remains intact. As I mentioned yesterday, I had reams of analysis but I just couldn't process it in time for the ramp, which is disappointing as I was leaning to go long. In agricultural commodities, wheat, corn and soybeans were flattish. Lumber fell by 0.5%. Government bonds show limited movement, with yields down one or two basis points. Municipal bond prices and yields showed little change, though closed-end municipal bond funds showed some life, with several rising by almost 1%!. High yield was junky, with iShares iBoxx $ High Yield Corporate Bond ETF (HYG) down 45 cents and SPDR Barclays High Yield Bond ETF (JNK) down 21 cents. Blackstone/GSO Strategic Credit Fund (BGB) continued to get hit mildly. Banks exhibited little movement. I added to Citigroup (C), Morgan Stanley (MS) and Bank of America (BAC) today. New Best Ideas List entrants, banks BB&T (BBT) and Regions Financial (RF), traded in the green.  Life insurance stocks were flat; Berkshire Hathaway (BRK.B) was up a beaner. Retail was mixed. Home Depot (HD) and Lowe's (LOW) bounced back after several days of  schmeissing. Wal-Mart (WMT) saw some profit taking and apparel still is weak. Macy's (M) and Bed, Bath and Beyond (BBBY) were slightly higher, but Best Buy (BBY) was a bit lower. The continued fall from grace of Sears Holdings (SHLD) on disappointing results -- it's down around 7% today -- should be a concern to real estate and mall owners. Biotech was uninspiring after recent declines. Valeant Pharmaceuticals (VRX) continues under distribution. Speculative Intrexon (XON) got hit. Allergan (AGN) rallied after yesterday's fall. Regarding autos: I covered my Ford (F) short, but still am short General Motors (GM), which is on my Best Ideas List as a short. Old tech was mixed, with IBM (IBM) a standout loser, down more than $2. Microsoft (MSFT) and Intel (INTC) managed small gains. Media was awful, with Comcast (CMCSA) and Disney (DIS) lower; the latter's earnings are today. Energy stocks got hit with the commodity. Though I covered Schlumberger (SLB) and Exxon Mobil (XOM) shorts for great gains, I should have held those shorts. But who knew $28 oil? Brokerages reversed after being much lower. They're now up on the day. In  "A Few of My Favorite Things," I again highlighted DuPont (DD), which is up another $1, and Procter & Gamble (PG), which is flat. (T)FANG, the object of my scorn in yesterday's opener, had a dead-cat bounce that was unimpressive by any standard. Amazon (AMZN) is still down on the day, and Tesla (TSLA) is barely higher. Alphabet (GOOGL) is unchanged.  NOSH had all four components higher, led by HD (mentioned previously). CRABBY was as flat as the desert. Radian Group (RDN) traded a tad higher, and other stocks made modest moves. Twitter (TWTR) moved ever lower, and the masochist in me purchased it in my pension plan, as I did C, BAC and MS at reasonably good prices. As mentioned, I added to a number of existing longs and re-established a SPY long rental and added a new iShares Russell 2000 (IWM) long. I likely will end the day between small and medium net long. It's lonely being long -- hopefully, my buys become green.
The Russell 2000 ended yesterday's trading session on a strong note, even in the face of a rugged broader market decline. The index looks oversold to me. There appears to be good support for IWM at the $95 level.
If you really want something short term in the books, consider selling XLF February 20 puts.
Compiling a list of what performed poorly last week would fill several notebooks.
Monday's action wasn't that great for the bulls, either.
As might be expected, one is bullish and the other is bearish.
But don't get too seduced by the allure of an intraday reversal.

Columnist Conversations

Juniper appears headed for a re test of major support near its 2015 low. With today's 1.5% loss JNPR is ...
$550 million to buy.
Spooking the markets now.
SPY $185.75 IWM $96.24

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