Sears Will Still Die an Ugly Death, Despite Just Getting $200 Million From Its Best Friend

 | Jul 18, 2017 | 8:00 AM EDT
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Sears Holdings Corp. (SHLD) will still go up in flames. 

So the bulls trading this dog of a company long may want to relax a bit. Shares of the dying department store surged more than 12% on Monday as Eddie Lampert loaned his biggest investment another $200 million. Lampert has now loaned Sears about $1.6 billion in a bid to keep the company afloat. The interest rate on Lampert's gift: an alarming 9.75%.

Why Sears is in big trouble extends beyond terrible-looking stores that needed massive investments like 10 years ago. Nope, there is an ugly storm brewing that could topple Sears within the next two years. Key considerations:

1. Lampert is sucking Sears dry with these high interest rate loans. The loans will have to be paid back a lot quicker than anyone realizes -- just check the filings. 

2. Sears continues to send negative signals on its business to suppliers by accepting such high interest rate loans. Desperation moves that are likely to hurt in-stock levels this holiday season

3. The company is internally broken. There is no path to cash generation. 

Get the notepad out folks, because the downfall of this once proud company is going to be quite the spectacle. 

What's Hot On TheStreet

Netflix is so impressive: By trouncing quarterly subscriber estimates and issuing solid guidance, Netflix Inc. (NFLX) did much to put to rest fears that its stock had gotten ahead of itself following a 31% rise so far in 2017, TheStreet's Eric Jhonsa says. The streaming giant also showed that it has reached a point where its sheer scale provides a competitive edge that makes it hard for even deep-pocketed tech and media rivals to slow it down, Jhonsa adds.

Overall, Netflix is an unstoppable beast because millennials like watching movies on the couch. 

Tesla is bizarre: Tesla Inc. (TSLA) is adding two new executives from major media corporations to its board of directors after investors urged the electric carmaker to add members without close ties to CEO Elon Musk, TheStreet reports.

James Rupert Murdoch, the CEO of Twenty-First Century Fox Inc. (FOXA) , and Linda Johnson Rice, the chairman of Johnson Publishing Co., will join Tesla's board, according to a company blog post.

Though the new board members are indeed independent, according to BoardEx, a relationship mapping service of TheStreet Inc., they lack experience in the car industry and have loose ties to the technology industry at best. Seeing as Tesla is burning through cash at a startling pace and is undergoing a Model 3 production ramp, adding experienced car or tech people to the board would have seemed like a better idea.

Meanwhile, Musk now apparently doesn't think his stock is overvalued, after TheStreet called him out on his comments over the weekend

Vicious downgrade on one hot tech stock: Barclays downgraded Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) to a price target of $9 on Tuesday TheStreet reports, giving it a rating of underweight from equal weight, saying that the valuation was pricing in a high degree of success but there is little evidence of share gains.

Barclays analyst Blayne Curtis predicted the stock would crash 35% from current levels. Since the beginning of June, shares of AMD have gained 23.5%, while Nvidia (NVDA) has risen almost 14%, on the back of a surge in demand for GPUs used to mine an alternative cryptocurrency called Ethereum (the units are known as Ether), TheStreet's Annie Palmer reports. A wave of bullish reports have come out since then saying that the boost in cryptocurrency mining demand could help Nvidia and AMD rise above a seasonally weaker fiscal second quarter, among other benefits.

But thanks to a steep drop in the prices of cryptocurrencies, the benefits may already be priced into the current quarter, with little left to gain thereafter, according to analysts.

The latest on Apple: Some bearish Apple (AAPL) comments went overlooked on Monday evening, but they could come into focus on Tuesday. 

Deutsche Bank analyst Sherri Scribner said expectations for Apple are too high, warning investors that they might be disappointed with iPhone sales growth in 2018 and 2019.

A market overly optimistic on future sales is "ignoring the fundamental challenges Apple faces in the smartphone market," Scribner wrote. Those challenges include saturation due to elongated refresh cycles, declining share, increased Chinese competition and a growing secondary market.

Apple is a holding in Jim Cramer's Action Alerts PLUS Charitable Trust Portfolio. Want to be alerted before Cramer buys or sells AAPL? Learn more now.

WATCH HERE: TheStreet's new series #AlphaRising:

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